England Football Kit


Engineered Mesh Back
For enchanced breathability
Team crest and pinstripe design
Celebrate the three lions

Nike England 2014 Stadium Away Shirt

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NEW ENGLAND 2014 STADIUM HOME SHIRT

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Nike England 2014 Away Shorts

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Nike England 2014 Away Socks

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NEW ENGLAND 2014 HOME SOCKS

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Nike Tiempo Football Boots

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England Supporters Football

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Nike England 2014 Home Shorts

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ENT Squad Pre-Match Top

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ENT Squad Training Top

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Nike England N98 Tech Track Top

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England Authentic TEE

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England Authentic Polo Shirt

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German Whip To English Flag: Meridian Dan Wants To Make Football Anthem
Following his doting ode to the German Whip, blacked out windows, leaning back, Meridian Dan says he'd love to dedicate his next record to our national team.

Despite tipping Germany for success in Brazil "I think Germany will win the World Cup, they have a really young and strong squad," Dan is hopeful that England can spring a surprise, "I really hope England prove me wrong."

German Whip To English Flag: Meridian Dan Wants To Make Football Anthem

Following his doting ode to the German Whip, blacked out windows, leaning back, Meridian Dan says he'd love to dedicate his next record to our national team.

Despite tipping Germany for success in Brazil "I think Germany will win the World Cup, they have a really young and strong squad," Dan is hopeful that England can spring a surprise, "I really hope England prove me wrong."

So with the youthful exuberance of Roy's boys having fans more excited about a major tournament than they have been for a long time, the North London rapper would love to do his bit for the team, "I would love to make a song about England winning the World Cup."

Born a Tottenham Hotspur fan, Dan explained that his love of the team came from their style of football as much as its geographic convenience "When Spurs played it played how and when I played out." Inspired by one of the club's's all-time greats who might just have influenced his Grime anthem, "I would go down and see Jürgen Klinsmann getting in his car."

As for his own game, Meridian Dan is honest "I played a lot of Football, I can't say I was the best man in the squad but I played with my heart and that's all you can do."

Follow Meridian Dan


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EXCLUSIVE VIDEO: ALEX OXLADE-CHAMBERLAIN TALKS TO RWD FOOTBALL
We first interviewed Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain before he made his Premier League debut way back in 2011. At the time we were highlighting the former Southampton man as one of RWD's 12 for '12 and it's safe to say he didn't disappoint. Quickly emerging as a key player in Arsenal's midfield; Chambo, or The Ox as he's affectionately known to ...

Exclusive Video: Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain Talks To RWD Football

Alex Oxlade Chamberlain speaks exclusively to RWD Football...

We first interviewed Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain before he made his Premier League debut way back in 2011. At the time we were highlighting the former Southampton man as one of RWD's 12 for 12 and it's safe to say h't disappoint. Quickly emerging as a key player in Arsenal's midfield; Chambo, or The Ox as he'™s affectionately known to fans of his rampaging runs and blistering pace, at just 20 years of age represents his club's present and future and shares a similar status at international level with the England star already representing the nation at Euro 2012 as well as scoring an absolute stunner against Brazil. Meeting RWD Football at the launch of the new England kit, The Ox talked nicknames, music, the possibility of facing Arsenal loanee Joel Campbell at the World Cup and Gary Neville's laser-pens.


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EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW: GLOBAL CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF NIKE FOOTBALL MARTIN LOTTI TALKS NEW ENGLAND KITS
With Nike and England unveiling the new home and away kits to be worn by Roy Hodgson's men in Brazil this summer, RWD Football's Tego Sigel was invited to The ICA in London for its launch and to talk everything that went into their heavily St. George inspired jerseys with Global Creative Director of Nike Football Martin Lotti.

Exclusive Interview: Global Creative Director of Nike Football Martin Lotti Talks New England Kits

Martin Lotti breaks down the process and all the key features in England's new home and away kits...

Previously: Global Creative Director of Nike Football Martin Lotti Talks New Brasil Kit

With Nike and England unveiling the new home and away kits to be worn by Roy Hodgson's men in Brazil this summer, RWD Football's Tego Sigel was invited to The ICA in London for its launch and to talk everything that went into their heavily St. George inspired jerseys with Global Creative Director of Nike Football Martin Lotti.

Has the way the kits look on HD TV become a new consideration for you guys?
When we design a kit I always say there are four things that we take into consideration. One is performance first and foremost. We wouldn't do anything that is not just new and better and we listen to the voice of the athletes. That's the first one. Then the second one is around style, making sure the way it fits, the way it falls on the body. The third one is around soul, bringing all of the country's pride into the mix, so that's the crest, the pennant tape, the fine details that are within the kits so St. George's Cross [on the away jersey] and the pinstripes [on the home jersey] that go back to the tailoring of suits all the way through to sustainability with 18 plastic bottles making those kits. So really it's about those four elements that we take into consideration as we are building the kits. So it's the study of art and science combining into one area.

How important are the small touches like the metallic crest and satin tape when you're creating a shirt which is so limited by its heritage and how early do those ideas come into your design?
Actually quite early in the process and the way I like to describe it is this idea of complex simplicity. So from a distance it's really, really simple, and it came from the inside, from the athlete, when they were holding the crest and saying 'This is what I'm fighting for' so it was all about the crest and everything else was meant to disappear so that from a distance. What you see is the crest and the juxtaposition of this highly technical garment and this highly ornate and embroidered and almost traditional crest, so there's the juxtaposition of new and old. It's the same same thing with the pinstripe as well as with the satin tape, so again from a distance it's very simple but as you get close the complexity increases, that's when you start to discover the pinstripes which goes back to the tailoring and suit making tradition that England has, but then as well with the satin tape giving this kind of bold read, that came back from the armours of St George. So it's finding a balance as you said of keeping it classic, but bringing modernity into it as well, to make it very rich as you get closer to it and the neckline being this chiseled neck, kind of sharp and modern and finding that right balance of being classic and modern at the same time.

Is there a pressure to innovate in a different way for the England kit, being that it's the birthplace of football?
For one it's an honour to do it and if you think about it England is the country that invented the game, so in that respect there's actually a long history to draw upon and if you actually look at the first England kit altogether was this minute white shirt and in particular with those two references, with the 1966 kit, obviously them winning 4-2 at Wembley with the red kit we're going back to the heritage and richness, obviously with the 1970 kit. So there is more than enough to draw upon, so we definitely acknowledge and celebrate the past, but to inform the future as well, so that's where the future comes in, the technology at Nike in regards to the fit for example, so we scanned our players with a 3-Dimensional Laser Scanner to make sure that it fits their body type, then we looked at thermoregulation in the same building as we are actually creating our kits we have our Nike Sports Research Lab that shows where you sweat and where you need thermoregulation, hence why you have the laser cut venting along the side. The fabrication itself took us more than four years to develop, so it's the first time we've had a kit which has the benefit of both worlds. It looks and feels like cotton but has the benefit of a synthetic jersey, bringing the best of both worlds together. You can see that we're trying to take quite a few parts into consideration – the athlete's needs, the sustainability needs, the manufacturing needs, the design and history – so we bring it all together to create an interesting and exciting kit.

You've heavily embraced the iconography surrounding St. George on the home and away jerseys, how did you decide to make that such a big part of the new England?
I think that felt like a very natural thing, in regards to looking at celebrating the history of the country as well as with the team itself and that was something working very closely with the federation itself that that came out quite strongly, that [St. George] is something they have a connection to, that's why we, very subtly, brought this cross into the away kit. Again with this idea of complex simplicity, from a distance you say ‘Oh, that's a red shirt!' But once you get close you notice there's much more to it and you actually have to be walking around to start seeing the line and where it creates this cross.

How and when do you start testing that subtle detail in regards to how it will appear in the stadium and how it will appear on TV?
The testing actually starts with the performance of the kits, so the bulk of the time is spent on how the fabric performs in minute one and minute 90, because I think the best testament is when you have the same performance benefit in the beginning of the game and the end of the game and that's what I'm most excited about with this kit, yes of course they have to look good, but they have to perform equally well, if not better and getting the feedback from the athletes after 90 minutes and saying how much they love it, that's the area that we got most excited about. The testing goes super, super deep, both from physical testing in the lab, but as well with the athletes themselves and then of course from a design point of view we obsess down to the details, the President of our company is British, so he was very closely involved in this jersey as well, so there is no stone unturned when it came to creating those kits.

Nike want to own as many moments at the World Cup as possible, so with that in mind was there ever a point when you were worried that the new details were either too subtle or perhaps not subtle enough?
I think the first thing is making sure The Federation and athletes are abreast, so yes of course it's a Nike moment too, but the more important part here is federation and how they would play. That is the first objective and then celebrating the nationality. The athletes have been training all their lives to earn a spot to be on their team, so our goal is to elevate that athlete experience and help them perform better in all circumstances. That's through the different temperatures in Brazil, which changes very drastically from the south to the north. Most people believe 'Oh, It's Brazil it's going to be hot!' Well, if you're in the south of Brazil it's actually going to be rather cold, but in the north of Brazil it will actually be very hot and humid. So how do we make kits that deliver upon this. So that's how we're trying to approach it, to stay authentic to the athletes and you can see in the entire outfits, not just in the kits but in the boots as well, that's where you can be a bit more experimental, the more individual side comes out with the footwear where as the kits are more about national pride.

With Nike's first kit for England coming in The FA's 150th anniversary year, a lot of people think you had to go very simple and very classic to match the heritage story being told across 2013, but this second year has produced a more exciting and innovative design, has this kit been in your thoughts for longer than the year since the last one was released?
Almost simultaneously. Knowing obviously that the World Cup is coming, very quickly we were already developing the other national team's kits as well but we were like how are we going to take this to another level?' And when half the world is watching, how do we make sure they look as sharp and well dressed as possible when they're in Brazil. And what I love about the white kit is with the freshly cut green grass and especially on high definition TV it will just be really sharp and clean and modern and then the subtleties of the kit itself, even down to the crest will actually come alive through areas like high definition TV, so you can actually go more subtle than you could in the past. Quite frankly it's very easy to over-design a kit and it actually takes much more restraint to simplify it down to the essence and that was the exercise we did for the England kit and, but as well through all of the kits to create this kind of simplistic modern uniform.

The shorts in the kit have been given a new tailored fit, is this unique to the England kit and what are the benefits players can expect to feel?
The shorts themselves, not unlike the jersey itself, have a satin tape so they go hand in hand. They are much more tapered, or tailored, than before, the fabrication has been updated as well. Even down to the socks. The sock is a critical performance tool and it's never talked about. We actually completely, from the ground-up, created a new sock with a new fit, when you look closely at it, the areas where you get most injuries is around the toes and by the ankle and we've added more protection to those areas with mid-foot arch protection, in the bottom we have traction devices, so you don't slip in it, so even the sock, which has been almost forgotten we went super deep into it and obsessed over it, so that kind of shows the literal obsession we have not only for the sock but for the shorts and the jersey and even down to the base layer as well. We fully created a base layer system specifically designed for football, knowing that you will need the different temperature variations so it really creates an entire outfit that fits seamlessly together.

Does the England kit create more of a stir when it's released than other international kits?
I think the passion of football runs very deep within England and being part of that is thrilling and the same thing with the World Cup where literally half of the world's population tunes in, I mean, what other sporting event, or any event, is out there where sport is celebrated and being part of this endeavour your heart beats a little faster and quite frankly I cannot wait to see those kits on the pitch in June.

But is it a different pressure developing an England kit knowing that whatever you do somebody is going to find that one thing to make a story out of and turn into a trending topic?
There's no more pressure on designing the England kit or the French kit or the Brazil kit. Our job is to do the best possible we can do for the athletes and for the country and that's all we can do. You can't worry about all the other stuff because it will drive you crazy. The only thing we can do is ask: Have we listened to the voice of the athletes? Have we improved the kit? Will it perform the whole 90 minutes? Does it look amazing?' and if we check the boxes on those we're super happy.


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Get behind Rooney, Gerrard and the lads in Brazil this summer with the new England 2014 World Cup kit.

It's been 48 years since an England team lifted the World Cup. In that time there have been some incredible moments. The dramatic victories against Belgium and Cameroon at Italia '90, the infamous 'Hand of God' which ended England's 1986 campaign, Beckham's sending off in 1998 and redemption as captain in 2002, and numerous penalty heartaches still live long in the memory. Can 2014 be the year that England rule in Brazil?

Every four years, from Newcastle to Plymouth and everywhere in-between, England comes alive in anticipation of glory. With Nike supplying the first World Cup kit in English history, retaining the heritage of a classic white home and red away kit but looking ahead to a new beginning, the nation won't be short on inspiration as that anticipation builds on the Road to Rio.
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